How To Stop Worrying and Start Looking For Solutions

Do you spend more time worrying than you should? Recently, it seems like I’ve been running into a lot of worried people. Many about job security. Others about company revenues being down. Some are worried about reports from the media that say economic statistics may be pointing towards another potential recession. And, among others, is health.

While there are some things we can and should be worrying about, we need to look for the silver lining and make sure we are worrying about things that we actually have control over. It’s easy to get caught up in things happening externally, like the negative news in the media. The problem, though, is that many of the worries we experience are out of our control and, as a result, we waste much-needed energy on them.

If you worry is job security. This is something you can control. Same thing with your health. Instead of wasting much-needed energy worrying about these types of issues, how about we look for solutions. If you are in danger of losing your job, set personal goals that will lead to an improved performance. Up your sales goals, come in a half hour early, stay a half hour late, join a personal improvement class, join a networking group to expand your personal network. At the same time, improve your health by eating a well-balanced diet, joining a gym, exercising regularly and dropping alcohol and smoking.

Maybe you’re worried about the government’s actions. As someone extremely invested in politics, this is one area I struggle. I find myself, at times, getting worked up about politics. While you can speak to your local representative (or even run for office) to make your voice heard, in the grand scheme of things, there’s only so much one can do. Make your voice heard and do your part but don’t lose sleep over investments that you cannot directly control.

If the media and news is causing you to worry, while you cannot change the news, there is something you can do. Turn off the TV/Radio/Internet! Stop worrying because it is out of your control. Instead, put good things in your mind. Philippians 4:8 says this:

“Finally, brothers and sisters, whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things.”

Instead of buying into the negative that closes your mind, fill your mind with positive. Anthony J. D’Angelo said, “Your mind is like a parachute. It only works if it is open.” I see entrepreneurs and employees that, because of negative economic reports, allow the news to affect their jobs. By chance, all of a sudden, there are no opportunities out there. Look at the glass half full. When we are looking at the glass half full, we are looking for the opportunities, rather than feeling bad for ourselves.

I love the quote, “You can be part of the problem or you can be part of the solution.” When we are worrying about things that are out of our control or not taking actions to fix worries that are, we are allowing ourselves to be part of the problem. Next time you find yourself worrying, ask yourself this: Is this something I can control? If so, take the necessary steps. If not, save your energy for the things you can control and start looking for solutions.

What types of worries do you have on a daily basis and what are some solutions?

Three Questions To Take a Step Back and Ask Yourself

Proverbs 10:6,9

MSG- “Blessings accrue on a good and honest life, but the mouth of the wicked is a dark cave of abuse. Honesty lives confident and carefree, but Shifty is sure to be exposed.”

In doing research for this post, I came across a quote I felt was applicable to this passage:

”Honesty is the first chapter in the book of wisdom.” Thomas Jefferson

I love that quote by Thomas Jefferson and it is so applicable when discussing the book of Proverbs. Honesty and integrity need to be the basic building blocks and the foundation for anyone conducting business. Nobody wants to be affiliated with a person who lies, cheats, tricks people, etc.

Recently, I was chatting with someone who was sharing with me their frustrations regarding a competitor that they know is not conducting business morally. This particular business owner has inherited a reputation within the industry for lying, cheating and, essentially, stealing from his customers. However, his customers haven’t picked up on that reputation yet. And as a result, to make things worse, he has had some short-term success as a result of these deceiving actions. And to add even more to the person’s frustrations that I was talking to, this gentleman is attempting to bring his competitors down by spreading lies about them in order to make himself appear better.

I was getting fired up just listening to that story. Definitely felt for the guy. Sometimes as someone who is striving to conduct business morally, it can seem flat-out unfair, especially when it seems like you are getting beat by the person acting without integrity. It may even be tempting to move to the other side since it seems to be working. My suggestion is to remember the passage above during these times. Unfortunately, there are always going to be people in the business world who are willing to strive for success by bypassing honesty and integrity. The Bible talks about how you reap the seeds you sow. If you sow negative actions, you’ll eventually reap negative results. Likewise, if you steadfastly remain firm, sowing good seeds, God promises blessings.

Business Ethics vs. Honesty and Integrity

We hear the phrase business ethics. Every organization seems to have something about it in their mission, vision or value statements. Conducting business with honesty and integrity goes way deeper than simply acting “ethical”, though. In my opinion, practicing business ethics doesn’t go far enough. There is way too much grey area. In my eyes, there is right and there is wrong. If God’s Word is your foundation (like mine is), then the difference between right and wrong should more times than not be black and white. There is no grey area with God.

As we are conducting business, my advice is that we take a step back and ask ourselves these three questions:

1. Am I treating my clients and employees the way I would like to be treated?

We all learned the golden rule when we were kids: treat others as you yourself would want to be treated. You wouldn’t want to be lied to or cheated against. We expect others to be honest in working with us. We should do the same to others.

2. Do I have to rationalize business decisions?

If we have to convince ourselves that doing something is okay, then it probably isn’t okay. God blessed each of us with a conscience that helps us decide between right and wrong. If we are struggling with a decision because our conscience is leading us in one direction but we want to go in the other direction, we may be rationalizing.

3. Do I do what I say I am going to do?

Our word is our bond. One of my favorite quotes is this:

“If you lose your money, you’ve lost nothing. If you lose a friend, you’ve lost something. If you lose your word, you’ve lost everything.”

Say what you mean and mean what you say. Simple as that.

Bonus question: Next time you are in a “sticky” situation and struggling with what to do, ask yourself this: Will I be able to sleep well tonight as a result of my decision?

Remember, one day we will have to answer to someone higher. In addition, the message above in verse 6 is that God’s blessings accrue on a good and honest life. There are a lot of people out there in the business world who claim to be practicing honesty and integrity but not enough living it out. My hope is that we can all aim to make honesty and integrity core principles in our business practices. Talk is cheap. Let’s strive to live them out.

Can you think of any more questions we should ask ourselves to make sure we are acting with honesty and integrity?

Sloth: What Is It and Why You Need to Avoid It

Proverbs 3: 11-12

RSV: “My son, do not despise the LORD’s discipline or be weary of his reproof, for the LORD reproves him whom he loves, as a father the son in whom he delights.”

Photo: “Prodigal Son” by Rembrandt,  1665

I have been somewhat alarmed at writing this post. Over on twitter, I have been expressing regularly how God has written more on my heart in writing this post than I have written down on paper (or screen). I have been alarmed because the same topic kept coming to mind: the sin of sloth. Let me explain.

In Proverbs 3. 11-12 , the author writes, “My son, do not despise the LORD’s discipline or be weary of his reproof, for the LORD reproves him whom he loves, as a father the son in whom he delights.”

In writing about the Word of God, I often find that I write the things I do because those are the things that are normally going on in my own life. You can see why, then, that the writing of this post has been of concern to me.

Sloth is one of those deadly sins and topics that is misunderstood and frankly, hardly talked about. That is because most people don’t know what it actually means.

Sloth does not mean laziness or sleeping in too late for church: it’s much more spiritual and deep than that. Sloth is despair in striving for God and His ways. It’s a spiritual laziness or sadness in wanting to be holy; at it’s core, a mistaken belief that God’s ways are less-than, and not more-than.

It is one of the most dangerous sins, and it is why history has labeled it a deadly sin.

Unfortunately we live in a culture which believes that the least important things are the most important things, and the most important things are the least important things. It’s not difficult to see: more money is spent in the porn industry than in any other industry. To them, lust is first and love is last. 

As Christians who are still on the journey home, we must ever be vigilant to stay on the path to the promised land, lest we get distracted in the desert and mistakenly desire to bow down to Pharaoh and his false promises of freedom. 

Now that we have defined what sloth is, the question begs, “So what do we do now as business owners, entrepreneurs, and young professionals?” I would suggest three things in the context of the rest of Proverbs 3.

First, as entrepreneurs, professionals, and even just as people who desire wisdom, we should always look outside of ourselves for the right answers. The author in verse 5 writes, “Trust in the LORD with all your heart, and do not rely on your own insight.” We should find people to learn from, but not just any people. Find people that we want to be like. In this case, holy people: people who have persevered in running the race after God, who have loved others sacrificially, who have given their opportunities back to God to serve Him and people.

Second, just like in business, we need to build our spiritual house on solid rock. Interestingly, one of the best ways to do this is to start confessing your sins out loud to another person, somebody you trust. Verse 11 states, “My son, do not despise the LORD’s discipline or be weary of his reproof, for the LORD reproves him whom he loves, as a father the son in whom he delights.” Because I am Catholic, I can testify from experience that verbal confession is one of the best experiences of living the Christian life. Yes, it is God alone who forgives sins, but there is a real freedom in letting it out and hearing that even for this terrible sin that I just confessed, I am forgiven and set free anew. The second part to confession is the counsel that is shared by the other. It is critical to find somebody who will help you through the valley: somebody who will love you enough to tell you where you are wrong and what steps you need to take to grow.

Third, I think sloth can be avoided and conquered if we ask for more faith. With the eyes of faith, we will realize that being a disciple of Jesus is more, not less, unlike what the culture wants us to believe. We can run our businesses with integrity, with honesty, not taking advantage of our employees or our clients, and we can still win. In fact, we will win more by aligning our hearts with the servant heart of the Lord because we will experience the joy of sacrificial giving. But notice- it first requires us to take actions to align our hearts with His before we can understand such riches. 

With these three things in mind, let us hope that we can experience the joys of discipleship and steer clear of sloth, for wisdom is “a tree of life to those who lay hold of her, those who hold her fast are called happy.”

Ryan Eggenberger is a writer, blogger, and social media consultant for political, religious, and business organizations. He teaches people how to come up with creative ways to make money doing what they love. He blogs regularly at
RyanEggenberger.com. Follow Ryan on Twitter!